What scientists try to do essentially is to select a certain domain, a certain aspect, or a certain detail, and see if that takes its appropriate place in a general scheme which has form and coherence; and, if not, to seek further information which would help them do that.-Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar

Nothing of what is visible, apart from light and color, can be perceived by pure sensation, but only by discernment, inference, and recognition, in addition to sensation.-Alhazen

There are two very different sorts of challenges that I see for AI–first, our systems are pathetic compared to biological systems…and secondly, moderately good performance from some approaches has sociologically led to winner-take-all trends in research.-Rodney Brooks

The human mind, no matter how highly trained, cannot grasp the universe. We are in the position of a little child, entering a huge library whose walls are covered to the ceiling with books in many different tongues. The child knows that someone must have written those books. It does not know who or how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. The child notes a definite plan in the arrangement of the books, a mysterious order, which it does not comprehend, but only dimly suspects. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of the human mind, even the greatest and most cultured, toward God. We see a universe marvelously arranged, obeying certain laws, but we understand the laws only dimly. Our limited minds cannot grasp the mysterious force that sways the constellations.-Albert Einstein

Viewed as a geometric figure, the ant’s path is irregular, complex, and hard to describe. But its complexity is really a complexity in the surface of the beach, not the complexity in the ant.-Herbert Simon, The Sciences of the Artificial

Self-organisation proposes, and natural selection disposes.-Pierre Oudeyer

McCarthy has given a couple of reasons for using the term “artificial intelligence.” The first was to distinguish the subject matter proposed for the Dartmouth workshop from that of a prior volume of solicited papers, titled Automata Studies, co-edited by McCarthy and Shannon, which largely concerned the esoteric and rather narrow mathematical subject called “automata theory.” The second, according to McCarthy was “to escape association with ‘cybernetics.’ Its concentration on analog feedback seemed misguided, and I wished to avoid having either to accept Norbert Wiener as a guru or having to argue with him.”-Nils Nilsson, The Quest for Artificial Intelligence